Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Brenda Ann Spencer: "Switched to overload"




Brenda Ann Spencer fired 36 rounds from a semi-automatic rifle through her bedroom window at a bustling schoolyard on January 29, 1979. Her shooting spree left two adults dead, and another nine people wounded (eight of them children). The rifle had been a Christmas present from her father, Wallace Spencer.

Amid the six and a half hour standoff, which eventually led to her arrest, she was asked what had compelled her to do such an unfathomably horrible thing. Young Brenda, only 16 years old at the time of the shootings, provided an equally horrifying response:

"I don't like Mondays. This livens up the day."

Like many people my age, my first exposure to the life and crimes of Brenda Ann Spencer came courtesy of the highly popularized song, "I Don't Like Mondays" by The Boomtown Rats. Singer/songwriter Bob Geldof had been in the midst of giving a radio interview when news of the tragedy came through on a Telex machine. Although the song has become a Monday morning radio classic across the globe, it is important to remember that it all began with a messed-up young woman, a telescopic rifle, and the haunting phrase which has since become ensconced in popular culture.


  
                                           Image: Nykta                                                    Image: margoaquato


"I don't remember, but I'm sure that I did it."


While Brenda has, in recent years, provided a somewhat clearer explanation for her terrible crimes than her initial 'Mondays' claim, it doesn't look like this broad is getting out of the Big House any time in the near future. Still very clearly detatched from what she did on that frosty morning back in '79, she claims to remember very little about what transpired that day, and nothing at all about the actual shootings.



Monday, January 14, 2013

Ashley Smith: "Wishing I were free..."




Today's post is not about a woman who committed murder, but rather about a woman who was murdered by the "justice" system.

Ashley Smith first came into contact with the system in 2003 when she was only 15 years old. She was incarcerated for series of petty crimes which included throwing crab apples at a postal carrier and pulling fire alarms. Originally sentenced to 30 days for the infarctions, Ashley ultimately served over 4 years in "treatment," and was transferred a staggering 17 times among 9 different prisons in 5 provinces due to the "unruly behaviour" she exhibited. She was involved in more than 800 "incidents," and attempted to harm herself at least 150 times.

Monday, December 24, 2012

Karla Does Christmas




The beautiful young lady in the photograph above is Karla Homolka's little sister, Tammy, who died tragically on Christmas Eve, 1990. An evening of holiday merriment at the Homolka home turned dark when Tammy  died as a result of being drugged and raped by older sister Karla and her fiance, Paul Bernardo. Although Tammy's death was initially ruled an accident, an unfortunate consequence of consuming too many holiday cocktails, the awful truth about what really happened that night was eventually revealed.

Years later, Karla testified against Bernardo (her estranged husband at that time) as he stood accused of two counts of first-degree murder in the sex-slayings of 14 year old Leslie Mahaffy and  15 year-old Kristen French. Behind closed doors with her lawyer and the police, and then again on the witness stand, Karla confessed that she helped Bernardo procure young victims to appease his desire for brutal sex with under age girls. She also confessed that one of those victims had been her own sister, Tammy.

In her 2005 interview with CBC Radio-Canada, Karla Homolka told reporter Joyce Napier that she has a particularly hard time coping with what she did around the holidays, presumably because of what she did to Tammy:

I think about it all the time. At every anniversary, every Christmas, all the time.

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Teacher Homolka: Rumour or Reality?



"Schoolgirl Killer" now a teacher?
Surely, this cannot be...


In her $3 e-book Finding Karla, Paula Todd made a strong case for why she ventured to seek out 
Karla Homolka, the woman who had reportedly fled to Guadeloupe with her new husband and child after serving a controversial 12 year prison sentence for her role in the sex-slayings of three Ontario teenagers.

Bloggers were now reporting that Homolka was teaching schoolchildren in the Caribbean. Karla Homolka teaching children?
[...] If there was a chance she was teaching children, many Canadians would want to know. And the only way to know was to find her.

Indeed, they would. Presumably, concerned parents in her new country of residence would want to know, as well. An estimated 65000 - 70000 copies of the 38-page booklet were purchased online; clearly, the public was eager to learn what "Karly Curls" was up to. However, after speaking with Homolka in person, Todd seemed convinced that the Teacher Karla myth was as good as debunked.

Monday, December 17, 2012

Howdy, Miss Kitty!




Howdy, Folks!

Just a quick note to make my new Blogger account official... From here on in, I'll be posting and responding as Miss Kitty. I decided to make the change due to convenience issues with the login; rest assured, I am still me. 

Or, maybe I'm not? You just can't trust anybody these days! ;)

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Bye Bye, Bébé Douceur



Karla Homolka's online business, Bébé Douceur, has disappeared.
Apparently, now that her clientele knows she did 12 years in prison
for rape and murder sucked all the fun out of hocking diapers.

Note: Children's faces have been obscured for their protection.

Friday, November 30, 2012

CBC Radio-Canada Interviews Karla Homolka



I was able to cobble together a web-ready version of this hard to find
interview using raw video files contributed by kouheikun @ WKH2012.

PART 1



PART 2



Note: Small portions of this videotaped interview are missing;
a complete (translated) transcript is provided after the jump below.


Immediately following her release from prison on July 5, 2005, Karla Homolka and her lawyer, Sylvie Bordelais, sat down with CBC Radio-Canada reporter Joyce Napier for an interview.

Before Canada's Most Hated Woman even opened her mouth, people across the nation were incensed that she had chosen to conduct the interview in French. This meant that the majority of people who lived in the province of Ontario, where she committed her crimes, were forced to accept the first (and probably only) public statement she has ever made concerning her role in the the rape-murder spree that dominated headlines in the early 1990s.

I've read this interview a number of times, and if I were asked to summarize it in the simplest of terms, I would say: low self esteem  (+) desire for relationship (x) rape-murder spree that captured global headlines and rocked an entire nation (=) out of prison in time to birth a child for each innocent life she stole (?)

Fatal Error. Cannot compute.